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Boston legal:quotations “Stick It”

October 27, 2006

“When the weapons of mass destruction thing turned out to be not true, I expected the American people to rise up. Ha! They didn’t.

Then, when the Abu Ghraib torture thing surfaced and it was revealed that our government participated in rendition, a practice where we kidnap people and turn them over to regimes who specialize in torture, I was sure then the American people would be heard from. We stood mute.

Then came the news that we jailed thousands of so-called terrorists suspects, locked them up without the right to a trial or even the right to confront their accusers. Certainly, we would never stand for that. We did.

And now, it’s been discovered the executive branch has been conducting massive, illegal, domestic surveillance on its own citizens. You and me. And I at least consoled myself that finally, finally the American people will have had enough. Evidentially, we haven’t.

In fact, if the people of this country have spoken, the message is: we’re okay with it all . Torture, warrantless search and seizure, illegal wiretappings, prison without a fair trial (or any trial), war on false pretenses. We, as a citizenry, are apparently not offended.

Now, you might think, we could have protested the old fashioned way: made a placard and demonstrated at a Presidential or Vice-Presidential appearance, but we’ve lost the right to that as well. The Secret Service can now declare free speech zones to contain, control and, in effect, criminalize protest.

Stop for a second and try to fathom that. At a presidential rally, parade or appearance, if you have on a supportive t-shirt, you can be there. If you are wearing or carrying something in protest, you can be removed. This, in the United States of America. This, in the United States of America! Am I the only one embarrassed?

I recently ran across a speech by Adlai Stevenson, U.S. statesman and diplomat. The year was 1952 and he said, “The tragedy of our day is the climate of fear in which we live, and fear breeds repression. Too often, sinister threats to the Bill of Rights, to freedom of the mind, are concealed under the patriotic cloak of anti-Communism.”
it’s the cloak of anti-terrorism.
Today, Stevenson also remarked, “It’s far easier to fight for principles than to live up to them.”


I know we are all afraid, but the Bill of Rights – we have to live up to that. We simply must.”

Season 2, Episode 19
Broadcast: March 14, 2006

http://www.boston-legal.org/19-stickit/ep19-stickit.shtml

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. October 28, 2006 11:42 pm

    im the first to commment yeaaaaaaaaay!

    u know… being arab… falasteeeni bil khussooos… is enough for them to label u as a terrorist.. if ur religious… its confirmed!

    dinya zbaleh….. fe akhirha…

  2. October 28, 2006 11:46 pm

    ah ur the first and am the second

    wa ana msatel so qar2t “dinya” as diana ba7ki meen hay diana 😀

    hal2 this is my main point of posting this : The tragedy of our day is the climate of fear in which we live, and fear breeds repression. Too often, sinister threats to the Bill of Rights, to freedom of the mind, are concealed under the patriotic cloak of anti-Communism.”
    it’s the cloak of anti-terrorism.

    eno how some countries are using anything to fight our freedom.wa hek sar dwal 3arbyeh kteer.3a asaas kan 3nna janet 7oryeh 2bl 😀

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